Home
Verdict: 
Good functionality, but taking everything into account there's definite room for improvement
Weight: 
465g

The Tumble & Fall Halo 2000 is a decent winter light with a few frustrating issues on the side. The two-part design, with double barrelled light unit and separate rechargeable lithium battery unit, meets the needs for both road and off-road riding with four simple modes to choose from and the addition of halo rings for extra attention.

The modes include a low, medium, high beam and flashing, although strangely there was no description of the exact strength of the modes other than the maximum 2000 lumens. Rarely should you ever need that strength on the road, but it was perfect for your late evening 'cross ride through the woods. The low and medium beams were plenty on both well-lit and unlit roads respectively.

> Find your nearest dealer here

The halo rings have two settings, with on or flashing allowing you to have, for example, medium main beam as well as flashing outer halo. As someone who tends not to use flashing modes, it was a nice touch and helped me feel a little more visible on the road.

In terms of construction, the aluminium light unit, weighing in at 100g, is light and well designed with an inbuilt heat sink to aid with cooling – much needed for such a powerful light. The base has a curved handlebar mount attachment screwed on, with protective foam in an attempt to prevent scratching. However, the plastic around the outer edge is harsh and does indeed scratch when in use, so you'll probably want to add something of your own.

A simple silicone ring is used to secure the light to your bar, which makes it easy for removal but does mean the light tends to rotate when used on bumpy roads or trails, which is particularly frustrating. The same occurs on the helmet mount, another area needing improvement.

The helmet mount has long Velcro straps, making for a fiddly attaching process and plenty of excess flapping around unless secured carefully. The mount uses the same silicone ring to attach the light, so you have to fasten it prior to securing it to the helmet, again adding to the difficulty. A neat addition to the package was a head strap to use the light as a head torch for walking, but then you have to find somewhere to store the battery pack...

> Check out our guide to the best front lights

It's safe to say the battery unit is on the large side. Maybe the six lithium batteries providing the 2000 lumens was a few too many, weighing in at over 300g alone. You will be struggling to fit this in your average saddle bag or mounting it on your frame without it getting in the way of your legs. The option I went with was getting rid of the saddlebag and attaching it to my seatpost, which wasn't ideal in winter weather.

The single length cable means attaching the battery at the front of the bike leads to plenty of cable wrapping around your frame. I found the best option was to use the head mount and store the battery in a rucksack, but then you have to go through the pain of attaching the light to your helmet.

It's not all bad, though, if you can deal with the niggling annoyances. Battery life on full power lasts up to 2.5 hours and 5 hours on medium power, making for plenty of riding between charges. Charge from empty was a little under 4 hours for me using the included wall plug charger. Unfortunately, no USB charging, which is annoying if you usually charge at work during the day.

Technically, the light warns you when the battery is running low, with the power LEDs turning red, but it doesn't last long. I only managed 20 minutes on low battery before the light cut off abruptly. Thankfully, I was near home, but worrying if you were still out in the dark. Ideally it would have automatically switched to a low power mode, but no such luck.

Overall, at £90 and with the functionality it offers, yes you are getting a lot of light for your money, but to my mind there are just too many frustrations to deal with on a daily basis.

Verdict

Good functionality, but taking everything into account there's definite room for improvement

If you're thinking of buying this product using a cashback deal why not use the road.cc Top Cashback page and get some top cashback while helping to support your favourite independent cycling website

road.cc test report

Make and model: Tumble & Fall Halo 2000

Size tested: n/a

Tell us what the light is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

The Tumble & Fall is said to have been 'born out of the desire to control the ride, to control what you see and where you see, in the suburbs, in the trees and into the darkness'.

In simple terms it does indeed achieve that and works well both on and off road. Plenty of mode options to choose from to fit your need.

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the light?

Voltage 8.4v dc

Dual Beam

Halo Ring Modes - ON - FLASHING - OFF

Halo 2000 Lumen Modes - LOW - MEDIUM - HIGH - FLASHING - OFF

Halo Rings Press red Button

Halo 2000 Lumen Press Green Button

OFF Long Press Of Green Button

Fuel Time 2.5hrs High, 5hrs Low and 25hrs flashing

Fuel Gauge Green LED Turns Red

4hrs charge time

Max Lumens 2000

6 Cell Rechargeable Lithium Battery 5200mAh (6 month Warranty)

Neoprene Battery Pack Holder

Helmet Mount

Head Torch strap and mount for walking

UK Lithium Charger

Bracket & O Rings

Rate the light for quality of construction:
 
7/10

In general it is a very well made aluminium light unit. Only negative was the sharp edges to the handlebar mount which scratched fairly easily.

Rate the light for design and ease of use. How simple was the light to use?
 
6/10

Well designed unit with heat-sink built in to help cooling. Battery pack is too large, though, making it difficult to attach to your frame without getting in the way. The helmet mount is a pain to attach too.

Rate the light for the design and usability of the clamping system/s
 
6/10

Easy to use, which was a big plus, making it quick to take on and off. However, the silicone ring used wasn't strong enough to stop it from sliding round when on bumpy roads or off road. Same with the helmet mount. Maybe needs a grippier material on the underside of the light for mounting.

Rate the light for waterproofing. How did it stand up to the elements?
 
8/10

No noticeable problems with waterproofing. Only worry was having to mount the battery pack under the saddle, which got very wet in bad weather. The water would get inside the outer protective rubber cover, but not into the battery pack itself.

Rate the light for battery life. How long did it last? How long did it take to recharge?
 
7/10

Lasts around 2.5 hours on full beam and 5 hours on medium, which is good. However the warning time of low battery was minimally low and it didn't automatically swap to a lower power setting, meaning it ran out within 20 minutes of the first warning. Charging time is reasonable at 4 hours from flat.

Rate the light for performance:
 
6/10

Performs well at the basic functions of a light, but lacking in the fine detail! Quite a few things could be made better.

Rate the light for durability:
 
9/10

Both parts of the unit still going strong have a tough month of weather. My worry would be the silicone ring breaking, but it comes with a spare.

Rate the light for weight:
 
6/10

The light unit itself is great, even when on your head, but the battery pack is large and heavy. It's not hugely noticeable when on your frame or backpack, but still oversized.

Rate the light for value:
 
7/10

As far as value for money goes, £90 for a very powerful light with useful modes is pretty impressive. But you can tell why it's cheaper when you start to use it.

Tell us how the light performed overall when used for its designed purpose

The light worked well both on and off road, with plenty of modes to suit the situation.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the light

I liked the addition of the halo rings, allowing you to have a flashing light while maintaining a constant beam.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the light

Frustrations with not being able to find a spot on the frame for the large battery pack easily, plus the light would rotate round the handlebar a little on bumpy roads. And, petty though it might sound, that the product brochure is riddled with spelling errors and mistakes.

Did you enjoy using the light? No

Would you consider buying the light? No

Would you recommend the light to a friend? No

Use this box to explain your score

The light does its job, with a range of modes to select from to suit your ride, but loses points on poor finer details and the size of the battery pack. Taking this all into account, although it deserves maybe an 8 for brightness alone, the overall score has to be lower.

Overall rating: 6/10

About the tester

Age: 22  Height: 5ft 8in  Weight: 62kg

I usually ride: Cannondale Cadx  My best bike is: Scott CR1 Pro

I've been riding for: Under 5 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Experienced

I regularly do the following types of riding: road racing, cyclo-cross, commuting, touring, club rides, sportives

15 comments

Avatar
handlebarcam [1043 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

2000 lumens is just taking the piss. Look at the test shot. Surely even the sort of morons who use lights like this on the road must realize that they are too bright when they themselves are blinded by the light reflected back at them by the hi-viz jackets of people standing ten meters away. Or reflected off the eyes of owls sitting in trees. Or off the moon. Lights are there to make your presence known, and allow you to spot obstacles, not light up the entire road and surrounding vegetation, or enable you to read the brand names on oncoming cyclists' clothing.

Avatar
Tony Farrelly [2899 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes

@handlebarcam I think the point of these is they are an all rounder light for on and off-road, the 2000 lumens is for off road use and the Halo bit with either medium or low beam for the road. 

Avatar
SoBinary [53 posts] 2 years ago
1 like
handlebarcam wrote:

2000 lumens is just taking the piss. 

On my road bike I use a 1200 lumen front light which is find for flat out riding at night.  On my off road bike I have a 2400 lumen light that is very nice for quick riding off road at night... if I hit the road on the way home I put it on its lower 1200 lumen setting.  Riding the canal towpath I usually put my fingers over the light if I meet somone - to save them having thier eyes welded to the back of their skulls.

Car drivers are often pissed off even with a 1200 lumen light (nicely aimed and dipped) but don't seem to understand that their headlights are no dimmer.  HID car headlamps are in the order of 2000 - 3500 lumens on low beam.  Those drivers who react to my 1200 lumen light with the beam aimed at the gutter ahead of me by flashing 6000 lumens of main beam in my face - all I can assume is that thes are the same people who put my life at risk and close pass me in daylight because I've delayed them by 20 seconds or so in their journey.

Lots of light is nice - but these high lumen lights ARE potentially dangerous.

 

100 lumens - not to illuminate the road but enough to BE SEEN

500-800 lumens - nice urban comuter lights.

1200 lumens - high speed country lane road lights.

2400 lumens - off road use only (dangerous for people to be looking at).

I have Exposure MAXX-D and Strada1200 lights. 

I have an Exposure flare 75 lumen rear light - frankly if anyone misses this they are blind.

Avatar
SoBinary [53 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

Oh rear light wise I usually have a cheaper blinky 2 led light also - I leave the Strada light on solid and have the blinky because it does catch the attention and is hard to miss.  A good reason to have more than one rear light is that you don't always see if it runs out which is dangerous - having two lessens the chance of this... although with the strada I can usally see the red glow if I glance downwards / backwards.

Avatar
olic [73 posts] 2 years ago
4 likes
SoBinary wrote:

 

Car drivers are often pissed off even with a 1200 lumen light (nicely aimed and dipped) but don't seem to understand that their headlights are no dimmer.  HID car headlamps are in the order of 2000 - 3500 lumens on low beam.  Those drivers who react to my 1200 lumen light with the beam aimed at the gutter ahead of me by flashing 6000 lumens of main beam in my face - all I can assume is that thes are the same people who put my life at risk and close pass me in daylight because I've delayed them by 20 seconds or so in their journey.

The amount of light in the source isn't the problem, the problem is where the light is being directed, which is why car headlights are designed the way that they are according to regulations. As people are always pointing out on here, these LED bulbs which throw light in all directions are inefficient and dazzling for other road users, and the only way around it is to point them so far downwards that it renders the 1000 lumens totally pointless.

Avatar
PixelPusher [9 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

Why not put the battery in an old bike bottle, the excess wire can also go in there. You've always got another bottle cage to use for a drink.

Avatar
nbrus [478 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes
SoBinary wrote:

Car drivers are often pissed off even with a 1200 lumen light (nicely aimed and dipped) but don't seem to understand that their headlights are no dimmer.  HID car headlamps are in the order of 2000 - 3500 lumens on low beam.  Those drivers who react to my 1200 lumen light with the beam aimed at the gutter ahead of me by flashing 6000 lumens of main beam in my face - all I can assume is that thes are the same people who put my life at risk and close pass me in daylight because I've delayed them by 20 seconds or so in their journey.

What you are saying is very interesting as it suggests that you don't realise just how blinding it can be to have one of these lights shone at you while driving. I can tell you it is absolutely blinding and you cannot even see a few yards in front due to the extreme glare. Even 200 lumens is blinding if shining in your direction.  If you are driving along at 30+ mph and are hit by a dazzling wall of light it is very dangerous. I think its about time these lights were made illegal for road use and bike lights were properly designed with dipped beam as they are in Germany.

Avatar
oldstrath [853 posts] 2 years ago
1 like
nbrus wrote:
SoBinary wrote:

Car drivers are often pissed off even with a 1200 lumen light (nicely aimed and dipped) but don't seem to understand that their headlights are no dimmer.  HID car headlamps are in the order of 2000 - 3500 lumens on low beam.  Those drivers who react to my 1200 lumen light with the beam aimed at the gutter ahead of me by flashing 6000 lumens of main beam in my face - all I can assume is that thes are the same people who put my life at risk and close pass me in daylight because I've delayed them by 20 seconds or so in their journey.

What you are saying is very interesting as it suggests that you don't realise just how blinding it can be to have one of these lights shone at you while driving. I can tell you it is absolutely blinding and you cannot even see a few yards in front due to the extreme glare. Even 200 lumens is blinding if shining in your direction.  If you are driving along at 30+ mph and are hit by a dazzling wall of light it is very dangerous. I think its about time these lights were made illegal for road use and bike lights were properly designed with dipped beam as they are in Germany.

I feel very conflicted about this. I read lots of moans about the terribleness of bright lights, and I do use an Ixon IQ for that reason, which is perfectly adequate probably 90% of the time. But

1. I've never actually experienced a problem with cyclists coming the other way. Lorries, yes, often. Every tractor on the road. A few cars. But not bikes, so I suspect a lot of the moaning is the usual ingroup complaining about an outgroup, rather than anything real.

2. Unlike car lights, it's actually quite hard to ensure bike lights are perfectly mounted, especially on handlebars, and the beam pattern of stvzo lights can cause issues.

3. The other 10% of the time I really do need more light. A main beam, which is the other feature of car lights. My current fix is a solarstorm x2, run only when needed, but if anyone has a better solution ...

Avatar
SoBinary [53 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
nbrus wrote:
SoBinary wrote:

Car drivers are often pissed off even with a 1200 lumen light (nicely aimed and dipped) but don't seem to understand that their headlights are no dimmer.  HID car headlamps are in the order of 2000 - 3500 lumens on low beam.  Those drivers who react to my 1200 lumen light with the beam aimed at the gutter ahead of me by flashing 6000 lumens of main beam in my face - all I can assume is that thes are the same people who put my life at risk and close pass me in daylight because I've delayed them by 20 seconds or so in their journey.

What you are saying is very interesting as it suggests that you don't realise just how blinding it can be to have one of these lights shone at you while driving. I can tell you it is absolutely blinding and you cannot even see a few yards in front due to the extreme glare. Even 200 lumens is blinding if shining in your direction.  If you are driving along at 30+ mph and are hit by a dazzling wall of light it is very dangerous. I think its about time these lights were made illegal for road use and bike lights were properly designed with dipped beam as they are in Germany.

I am fully aware of how dangerous the lights are which is why my post mentions it, it also mentions that the light was "nicely aimed and dipped"... thats because I spent time making sure the beam pattern was aimed low and straight i.e. directly ahead of me.  As part of that aiming adjusting process I walked ahead of my bike and placed myself in the position of an oncoming car driver to make sure I'd done a good job.  The Strada light has a reasonably aimed beam pattern - the MaXXD does not but its not really intended for on road use.

Your comments are reasonable comments but they don't show any evidence you read my post.

Avatar
Peowpeowpeowlasers [518 posts] 2 years ago
3 likes

> I spent time making sure the beam pattern was aimed low and straight

You cannot "aim" your light any more than you can "aim" a hosepipe spraying water on full spread. You need a light with a shaped beam or you'll dazzle other road users no matter where you aim your light.

Avatar
Morat [272 posts] 2 years ago
3 likes

You can't have a round beam light "Nicely aimed and dipped" unless you are prepared to point it about 3 feet in front of you. I live in a rural area without streetlights so I'm well aware of the situation from both sides of the windscreen and I am firmly in the camp of banning round beam lights on the road. There's no net benefit to the cyclist of slapping 1200 Lumens down the road to avoid potholes if it means you're taking a chance with every oncoming motorist being dazzled. For the motorist - it's another chance to complain about "Bloody Cyclists". In my ideal world bike lights would have dip and full beam just like motor vehicle lights. That system works well and now that bike lights are approaching the same light output as motor vehicle lights (and possible exceeding the outputs achieved when the construction and use regs were put in place) I think it's sensible to include bike lights in the same regulations.

Avatar
FluffyKittenofT... [1793 posts] 2 years ago
1 like
olic wrote:
SoBinary wrote:

 

Car drivers are often pissed off even with a 1200 lumen light (nicely aimed and dipped) but don't seem to understand that their headlights are no dimmer.  HID car headlamps are in the order of 2000 - 3500 lumens on low beam.  Those drivers who react to my 1200 lumen light with the beam aimed at the gutter ahead of me by flashing 6000 lumens of main beam in my face - all I can assume is that thes are the same people who put my life at risk and close pass me in daylight because I've delayed them by 20 seconds or so in their journey.

The amount of light in the source isn't the problem, the problem is where the light is being directed, which is why car headlights are designed the way that they are according to regulations. As people are always pointing out on here, these LED bulbs which throw light in all directions are inefficient and dazzling for other road users, and the only way around it is to point them so far downwards that it renders the 1000 lumens totally pointless.

This issue just confuses the hell out of me. I don't want to dazzle anyone, but I also quite want to be able to see where I'm going, especially on unlit or poorly-lit roads, and it seems very tricky to satisfy both those things.

Bike lights aren't so securely mounted as car headlights so I'm not entirely convinced its really possible to have them satisfying regulations in the same way. Besides, car headlights are often left full-beam for oncoming cyclists, or pedestrians. I frequently find them dazzling me.

It does seem like the authorities are ignoring the issue. Some sort of regulation and guidance from them (and from the bike industry) would be nice.

Avatar
oldstrath [853 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
FluffyKittenofTindalos wrote:
olic wrote:
SoBinary wrote:

 

Car drivers are often pissed off even with a 1200 lumen light (nicely aimed and dipped) but don't seem to understand that their headlights are no dimmer.  HID car headlamps are in the order of 2000 - 3500 lumens on low beam.  Those drivers who react to my 1200 lumen light with the beam aimed at the gutter ahead of me by flashing 6000 lumens of main beam in my face - all I can assume is that thes are the same people who put my life at risk and close pass me in daylight because I've delayed them by 20 seconds or so in their journey.

The amount of light in the source isn't the problem, the problem is where the light is being directed, which is why car headlights are designed the way that they are according to regulations. As people are always pointing out on here, these LED bulbs which throw light in all directions are inefficient and dazzling for other road users, and the only way around it is to point them so far downwards that it renders the 1000 lumens totally pointless.

This issue just confuses the hell out of me. I don't want to dazzle anyone, but I also quite want to be able to see where I'm going, especially on unlit or poorly-lit roads, and it seems very tricky to satisfy both those things. Bike lights aren't so securely mounted as car headlights so I'm not entirely convinced its really possible to have them satisfying regulations in the same way. Besides, car headlights are often left full-beam for oncoming cyclists, or pedestrians. I frequently find them dazzling me. It does seem like the authorities are ignoring the issue. Some sort of regulation and guidance from them (and from the bike industry) would be nice.

If you can mount it at the fork crown the Ixon IQ is probably stable enough to meet German regulations and be usable. In fairness, that's the original design location for the dynamo lights of which this is a derivative, and, absent proper switchable main beams, it is probably as good as you'll find.

I've never had a problem with cars not dipping headlights, my issues are more with badly adjusted lights, lorries with their own Son et Lumiere, and tractors, which must be exempt from any regulations judging by the floodlights they all carry. There may be an issue with automatic dipping systems if your lights are not at maximum brightness, apparently because the sensors may misinterpret the rapid switching used to "dim" LED bulbs.

Avatar
Anthony.C [233 posts] 2 years ago
3 likes

There has to be a market for decent, bright lights with a proper cut off that puts the light on the road where you want it and not in the sky. There is the Philips one (I own one) that has a great cut off but it's a bit heavy and it's been around a few years now, something similar but lighter and brighter with better battery life should be possible now. 

Avatar
kevvjj [253 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

I have one of those original 'Magicshine' type lights of approximately 900 lumen. A long time ago I purchased a replacmeent front glass for it which is more like a lens. It gives you a light that looks like a wide rectangle. So the top of the beam is completely cut off (I no longer illuminate the tops of trees for example) but I get to see the whole width of the road. I have had no issues with oncoming motorists flashing me. Talking about high/low beam; because this light has the rubber band attachment it is a simple tap forward to 'dip' the beam if necessary (locals walking dogs etc). It works pretty well for (proper) off-road too but the forward throw is a tad reduced.